Protecting our water supply is a responsibility we all share. This site is a central location offering tips and advice on saving water at home. The information found here is drawn from water districts across California, highlighting some of the most valuable messages on water conservation.

By sharing rebates, tips and tools to conserve water here, we hope to empower you to participate in our quest for a sustainable future. You have the power to be the most important ally.

Where Does Your Water Come From?

Water in California comes from a variety of sources, including underground aquifers, snow melt in Northern California, and from as far away as Wyoming via the Colorado River. Learn more about your water sources below.

The Inland Empire sits on top of the Chino, San Bernardino, Cucamonga, Riverside, Arlington, Temescal, Elsinore, West San Jacinto, Hemet-San Jacinto and Temecula-Murrieta basins. A basin is natural, underground water storage that can be accessed through wells.

The State Water Project and Colorado River provide a majority of the supply for the Inland Empire. The State Water Project brings water from Northern California and the Colorado River brings water from Colorado, through Utah, Arizona and Nevada, into Southern California.

The Santa Ana River starts in the peaks of the San Bernardino Mountains, where it is fed by melting snow. The river has been a source for people in the area for more than 9,000 years. It travels 96 miles to the Pacific Ocean and is the largest river in Southern California.

The State Project Water originates with rivers in Northern California then travels through the Sacramento – San Joaquin Delta, the heart of the system. It eventually is delivered to Southern California via the 441-mile California Aqueduct. This resource provides water to 25 million Californians and 750,000 acres of irrigated farmland.

Drainage systems are in place to capture rain during heavy storms, helping to prevent flooding. Some stormwater is added back to local groundwater basins, which use percolation ponds to allow the water to seep slowly through the ground and replenish the basin.

Wastewater that is treated can be used by businesses and municipalities for commercial purposes or to irrigate large areas. Using recycled water helps protect drinking water supplies. Recycled water is carried in separate purple pipes so it is not confused with potable water.

Water with high levels of salinity are not usable for irrigation or drinking water. But a process known as desalination removes salts and nitrates, turning it into potable water and cleaning up basins. Locally, two Chino Basin Desalter facilities distribute tens of millions of gallons of drinking water every day to several agencies across the Inland Empire.

How Your Water Is Used

California has received little rainfall the past few years. In addition, this region relies heavily on imported water to supplement water shortages. This statewide water crisis should demonstrate the need for water conservation.

Average Indoor Use

AVERAGE GALLONS PER CAPITA PER DAY (n=1.1880).

(AWWA Research Foundation and the American Water Works Association, 1999)

Outdoor Vs. Indoor

Outdoor watering represents nearly 60%-70% of residential water usage in California. Reducing water consumption outside the home results in a larger water savings but this should not preclude water savings inside the home.

Water retailers along with California residents can help offset water shortages by practicing water conservation daily. This can be done through modification of water-wasting activities inside and outside the home. Below are water conservation tips to assist residents and businesses with efficient ways to reduce water consumption which also results in a financial savings for the consumer.

CONSERVATION TIPS

Indoor

Indoor

Outdoor

Outdoor

CONSERVATION TIPS

Indoor

Indoor

Outdoor

Outdoor